April 24, 2014
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Multiple Sclerosis

 Health Home >> Multiple Sclerosis >>  

Nausea and Vomiting

(Vomiting, Upset Stomach)

The Facts on Nausea and Vomiting

Vomiting is the act of forcefully expelling the stomach's contents out through the mouth. It's usually an involuntary action brought on by nausea, but can be deliberately provoked. Almost everyone has had this unpleasant experience at least once (if not many times) in his or her life. Nausea refers to the unpleasant "queasy" feeling that you get when you're about to vomit, one that's accompanied by uncontrollable contractions of the stomach that begin before and continue during vomiting.

Nausea and vomiting aren't normally medical conditions themselves, but are commonly symptoms of a disorder or illness.

Feeling under the weather?

Could your symptoms be signs of the flu?

Answer a few quick yes-or-no questions to help get you on the road to diagnosis and recovery!


Do I have the flu?

Results

 1  2  3 



  • sudden onset of fever or
  • sudden onset of cough


  • fatigue (extreme tiredness)
  • sore throat
  • body or muscle aches
  • chills
  • headache
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • poor appetite
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea


  • people 65 years old or over
  • children under 5 years old
  • pregnant women
  • people who are obese
  • people living in a long-term care facility or nursing home
  • people with any of the following medical conditions:
    • asthma
    • cancer
    • chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD)
    • diabetes
    • heart disease
    • kidney disease
    • weakened immune system (e.g., HIV/AIDS)


YES YES      NO NO

It's unlikely that you have the flu.

You may have the flu.

You probably have the flu.

But you do have at least 1 risk factor that puts you at risk of flu complications. If you do experience any flu symptoms, talk to your doctor or visit a walk-in clinic as soon as possible.

And you may also have at least 1 risk factor that put you at risk of flu complications.

Talk to your doctor or visit a walk-in clinic if your symptoms concern you or if they get worse.

Talk to your doctor or visit a walk-in clinic as soon as possible.

Enter your postal code to find a clinic near you:  

Know the flu basics and how you can protect yourself and your family.

NOTE: If your symptoms still concern you, speak to your doctor or go to a walk-in clinic as soon as possible.

Flu complications include bacterial pneumonia, ear infections, or worsening of existing chronic conditions

If your doctor prescribes an antiviral medication, start the medication within 48 hours after your symptoms begin. Antivirals, when started within 48 hours after symptoms begin, can help relieve flu symptoms and make the flu less severe.

Home treatment options for the flu include getting plenty of rest, drinking lots of fluids, treating symptoms (such as using a pain reliever for body aches and fever), and avoiding contact with others.

Other treatment options for the flu include home treatments like getting plenty of rest, drinking lots of fluids, treating symptoms (such as using a pain reliever for body aches and fever), and avoiding contact with others.

Get the facts about the 2 main types of medications used to treat the flu and home treatments you can try.

If you experience any of these severe symptoms, seek medical help right away:

  • shortness of breath, rapid or difficulty breathing
  • chest pain
  • bluish or grey skin colour
  • bloody or coloured mucus/spit
  • severe or continuous vomiting
  • sudden dizziness or confusion
  • high fever that's lasted more than 3 days
  • low blood pressure
  • stiff neck, sensitivity to light
sponsored by  

Other resources about flu:


Causes of Nausea and Vomiting

Vomiting has many and varied causes. It can be triggered by ingesting a toxin or poison (e.g., alcohol, a prescription or recreational drug, or contaminated food), by an inflammation of the stomach lining, or by a bowel obstruction. It may also occur in diseases that delay the emptying of the stomach, such as diabetes. Injuries to the head, such as concussions, often lead to vomiting. Psychological factors may provoke vomiting in situations that are frightening or in some way horrifying or repulsive. People with motion sickness or other conditions of the vestibular (balance) system experience nausea and vomiting as a result of certain types of movement (e.g., travelling in a car or airplane).

Vomiting on purpose may play an important role in eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. When this is the case, it's hard to detect, even after weeks or months of constant vomiting. Although people who vomit like this may do so without losing weight or becoming dehydrated, induced vomiting can lead to malnutrition and metabolic abnormalities.

Nausea during pregnancy is common, especially during the first three months. For pregnant women and some other people, certain smells and tastes can cause nausea. Medications and medical therapies can also produce nausea as a side effect. For example, chemotherapy treatment for cancer often causes nausea and vomiting. If you feel nauseous because of medication you're taking, you should decide with your doctor whether to put up with it (the nausea may be temporary), or to stop taking the medication. You may also be prescribed an anti-nausea medication to take with the medication causing the nausea.

If you vomit or feel the urge to vomit for a prolonged period of time, you should seek medical attention. If you vomit anything other than the contents of your stomach (fluids and partially digested food), or produce vomit that contains blood, substances that look like coffee grounds, or something you think is odd or strange, see a doctor.





Continued... 1 | 2 | Next

Ad

The contents of this site are for informational purposes only and are meant to be discussed with your physician or other qualified health care professional before being acted on. Never disregard any advice given to you by your doctor or other qualified health care professional. Always seek the advice of a physician or other licensed health care professional regarding any questions you have about your medical condition(s) and treatment(s). This site is not a substitute for medical advice.

© 1996 - 2014 MediResource Inc. - MediResource reaches millions of Canadians each year.