April 18, 2014
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Drug Factsheets

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Dostinex

(cabergoline)

DIN (Drug Identification Number)

02242471 DOSTINEX 0.5MG TABLET

How does Dostinex work? What will it do for me?

Cabergoline belongs to a class of medications known as prolactin inhibitors. Prolactin inhibitors such as cabergoline are used to treat different types of medical problems that occur when too much prolactin, a hormone produced by the pituitary gland in the brain. An excess production of prolactin can result in menstrual problems in women and fertility problems in men and women.

Cabergoline stops the brain from making and releasing prolactin from the pituitary gland. Cabergoline is also used to prevent the onset of normal lactation (milk production) in cases where there is a medical need to prevent lactation.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

How should I use Dostinex?

When used to prevent the onset of normal lactation, the dose is 1 mg of cabergoline given as a single dose on the first day after having a baby.

For prolactin disorders, the recommended starting dose of cabergoline for adults is 0.5 mg per week, given in 1 or 2 doses per week (for 2 doses, the tablet is cut in half). The dose may be increased by 0.5 mg per week until a maximum of 2 mg per week is reached. The dose should not be increased more often than every 4 weeks.

The eventual dose of the medication will depend on the results of lab tests that measure the amount of prolactin in your blood. After the tests have been in the normal range for at least 6 months, the doctor may decide to stop the medication and continue to monitor the levels of prolactin in the blood.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon you remember if it is within 1 or 2 days of when you were supposed to take it. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication in a dry place, away from heat and direct light, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.





What form(s) does Dostinex come in?

Each white, scored, capsule-shaped tablet, scored on one side, with "P" and "U" on either side of the breakline and "700" engraved on the other side of the tablet, contains cabergoline 0.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose anhydrous and leucine.

Who should NOT take Dostinex?

You should not use cabergoline if you:

  • are allergic to cabergoline or any ingredients of the medication
  • are allergic to ergot derivatives (e.g., ergotamine)
  • have a history of lung or heart fibrotic disorders
  • have a history of mental illness
  • have altered heart valves (e.g. valve restriction)
  • have an ulcer or bleeding stomach
  • have had pregnancy complications with high blood pressure
  • have high blood pressure that is not controlled
  • have poor circulation of fingers and toes (e.g. Raynaud's syndrome)

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