April 25, 2014
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Drug Factsheets

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Apo-Ibuprofen

(ibuprofen)

DIN (Drug Identification Number)

00441643 APO-IBUPROFEN 200MG TABLET
00441651 APO IBUPROFEN 300MG TABLET
00506052 APO IBUPROFEN 400MG TABLET
00585114 APO IBUPROFEN 600MG TABLET
02281384 IBUPROFEN LIQUID FILLED CAPSULES 200MG
02310880 EXTRA STRENGTH IBUPROFEN LIQUID FILLED CAPSULES 400MG
02293013 PAMPRIN IBUPROFEN FORMULA 400MG CAPLET
02317982 IBUPROFEN MENSTRUAL PAIN RELIEF

What side effects are possible with Apo-Ibuprofen?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • abdominal or stomach cramps, pain, or discomfort (mild to moderate)
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness, drowsiness, or lightheadedness
  • headache (mild to moderate)
  • heartburn
  • gas
  • indigestion
  • nausea
  • nervousness
  • vomiting

Although most of the side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • asthma (e.g., wheezing, shortness or breath, chest tightness)
  • bloody or black tarry stools
  • blurred vision or vision changes
  • changes in colour of urine (e.g., darker, red, or brown colour) or in the amount of urine
  • confusion
  • depression
  • flu-like symptoms (chills, fever, muscle aches or pains) together with skin rash
  • hearing problems (e.g., ringing in the ears)
  • itching or hives
  • loss of appetite
  • painful urination or difficulty urinating
  • sensitivity to sunlight (sunburn, blisters, skin rash, redness, itching, discoloration, or vision changes)
  • sinusitis (e.g., nasal congestion)
  • skin rash
  • swelling of feet or lower legs
  • vomiting blood

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • symptoms of an allergic reaction (hives; itching; difficulty breathing; swelling of the face, mouth, tongue, or throat)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.





Are there any other precautions or warnings for Apo-Ibuprofen?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Fluid and electrolyte balance: Fluid retention and edema have been reported with use of this medication. Use ibuprofen with caution if you:

  • are recovering from a surgical operation under general anesthesia
  • have certain heart conditions (e.g., congestive heart failure)
  • have high blood pressure
  • have kidney disease or reduced kidney function
  • have any other condition that might lead to fluid retention

Gastrointestinal problems: Stomach ulcers, perforation, and bleeding from the stomach have been known to occur during therapy with this medication. These complications can occur at any time and are sometimes severe enough to require immediate medical attention.

The risk of ulcers and bleeding increases for people taking higher doses of ibuprofen for longer periods of time. Stomach problems are also more likely to occur with alcohol use. Do not drink alcohol while taking this medication.

If you are prone to irritation of the stomach and intestines, particularly if you have had a stomach ulcer, bloody stools, diverticulosis, or other inflammatory disease of the stomach or intestines (such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease), discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Stop taking the medication and contact your doctor immediately if you experience symptoms or signs suggestive of stomach ulcers or bleeding in the stomach (black, tarry stools). These reactions can occur at any time without warning during treatment.

Kidney function: Long-term use of ibuprofen may lead to a higher risk of reduced kidney function. This is most common for people who already have kidney disease, liver disease, or heart failure; for people who take diuretics (water pills); and for seniors.

If you have severely reduced kidney function and kidney disease you should not take ibuprofen.

Medical conditions: If you have heart disease, heart failure, high blood pressure, diabetes, thyroid disorders, glaucoma, or enlarged prostate, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Potassium levels: There is a risk of high levels of potassium in the blood for people who take NSAIDs, including ibuprofen. People most at risk are seniors; those who have conditions such as diabetes or kidney failure; and those taking beta-blockers (e.g., metoprolol), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., ramipril), or some diuretics (water pills).

Pregnancy: This medication is not recommended for use during pregnancy.

Breast-feeding: This medication may pass into breast milk in small quantities. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

What other drugs could interact with Apo-Ibuprofen?

There may be an interaction between ibuprofen and any of the following:

  • acetaminophen
  • acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)
  • angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., enalapril, lisinopril, ramipril)
  • anticoagulants (e.g., dalteparin, enoxaparin, heparin, tinzaparin, warfarin)
  • antidiabetes medications (e.g., gliclazide, glyburide)
  • cholestyramine
  • clopidogrel
  • colestipol
  • cyclosporine
  • digoxin
  • diuretics (e.g., furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide)
  • insulin
  • lithium
  • methotrexate
  • other NSAIDs (e.g., ketorolac, indomethacin, naproxen)
  • phenytoin
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (e.g., citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine)

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

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