November 1, 2014
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Fertility


Should I see a doctor about my fertility?

When a woman should see a doctor about fertility

You should see a fertility specialist anytime you have concerns about your fertility.

Seek help (find a fertility clinic near you) if:

  • you are under 35 and unable to conceive after a year of regular, unprotected intercourse
  • you are 35 to 37 and unable to conceive after 6 months of regular, unprotected intercourse
  • you are over 37 (women over 37 do not need to wait 6 months before seeing a doctor, because waiting too long to seek help could harm their chances of conceiving)

By definition you are considered infertile if you've been unable to conceive after a year of regular, unprotected intercourse (or after 6 months if you're 35 or older).

However, you should also see a fertility specialist if you're trying to conceive and any of the following apply to you:

  • irregular or absent periods
  • two or more miscarriages
  • prior use of an intrauterine device (IUD)
  • endometriosis/painful menstruation
  • breast discharge
  • excessive acne or hirsutism (body hair)
  • prior use of contraceptive and no subsequent menstruation
  • history of sexually transmitted infection
  • history of pelvic/genital infection
  • previous abdominal surgery
  • reversal of surgical sterilization
  • chronic medical condition (e.g., diabetes, high blood pressure)
  • history of chemotherapy or radiation therapy

Learn more about fertility treatments and what to expect.

When a man should see a doctor about fertility

You should see a fertility specialist anytime you have concerns about your fertility. By definition you are considered infertile if you've been unable to conceive after a year of regular, unprotected intercourse (or after 6 months if you're 35 or older).

You may also wish to see a fertility specialist if any of the following risk factors apply to you:

  • history of sexually transmitted infection
  • history of pelvic/genital infection
  • previous abdominal surgery
  • reversal of surgical sterilization
  • chronic medical condition (e.g., diabetes, high blood pressure)
  • history of chemotherapy or radiation therapy
  • mumps after puberty
  • previous urologic surgery
  • prostate infection
  • family history of cystic fibrosis or other genetic disorders

It is important to remember that approximately a third of all fertility problems have a male factor component.

If you are ready to see a fertility specialist, find out how to take this step.

Displaying 3 of 5 Articles
Ad

The contents of this site are for informational purposes only and are meant to be discussed with your physician or other qualified health care professional before being acted on. Never disregard any advice given to you by your doctor or other qualified health care professional. Always seek the advice of a physician or other licensed health care professional regarding any questions you have about your medical condition(s) and treatment(s). This site is not a substitute for medical advice.

© 1996 - 2014 MediResource Inc. - MediResource reaches millions of Canadians each year.